Blog

The most informative of all ‘disposal-oriented discussions’ is the talk that focuses on the statistics that factually enlightens Australians on how hazardous waste mismanagement affects Australia. So how much waste accumulation are we referring to is? A huge amount!

Waste can be of many types: there’s core waste, liquid waste, waste products, and non-core waste materials that can be collected from any country’s disposal system.

According to the National Waste Report of Australia in the year of 2018, core waste can be categorised as:

  1. Ash
  2. Glass Organics
  3. Hazardous Waste
  4. Masonry (generally, the most accumulated trash category in Australia)
  5. Metal 
  6. Paper and Cardboards
  7. Textiles, Leather, and Rubber (generally, the least gathered trash category in Australia)

The average disposal of waste by an Australian per year is 2.7 tonnes of waste, which adds up to a rough amount of 67 million tonnes of disposables in Australia. 

The truth is that dispensable waste are disposed by civilians to bins; the rest of the disposal system is not transparent for them, or not deemed as important. Either way, being aware of the Australia waste disposal system can be of most importance to understand how the stats of Waste disposal fluctuate every year. 

Australia’s Waste Management Systems

 Australian Waste Management Systems captures, recycles, and disposes of irrevocable rubbish. This process has been described under three main stages: 

L1 – Incoming Waste – The accumulation from various sources happen at this stage. Industrial, commercial and constructional are all being collected and kept to transfer to L2.

L2 – All waste has been screened and sorted where recyclable material such as metal, are distinguished from non-recyclable materials 

L3 – Recyclable waste has been sent for resurrection while Organic waste has been stored to capture methane (a by-product of waste) which is used for energy production

So, the journey the trash that you dispose of at home or office goes around a huge cycle, and it doesn’t end in the bin. This trash would either be disposed of, used as renewable energy, or recycled to be used again. To elaborate on this process, please refer to the table given below:

Australian Waste Stats in 2016-2017

  • Waste Generated – 67 million tonnes
  • Waste Recycled – 37 million tonnes
  • Waste to Energy Creation – 2.0 million tonnes
  • Waste Disposal – 27 million tonnes

    Resource recovery rates
    • Core Waste plus Ash – 58%
    • Core Waste only – 62%

Australian Waste Stats in 2014-2015

  • Waste Generated – 66 million tonnes
  • Waste Recycled – 36 million tonnes
  • Waste to Energy Creation – 2.4 million tonnes
  • Waste Disposal – 27 million tonnes

    Resource recovery rates
    • Core Waste plus Ash – 58%
    • Core Waste only – 62%

Australian Waste Stats in 2013-2014

  • Waste Generated – 63 million tonnes
  • Waste Recycled – 35 million tonnes
  • Waste to Energy Creation – 2.9 million tonnes
  • Waste Disposal – 25 million tonnes

    Resource recovery rates 60%

Australian Waste Stats in 2012-2013

  • Waste Generated – 63 million tonnes
  • Waste Recycled – 34 million tonnes
  • Waste to Energy Creation – 2.6 million tonnes
  • Waste Disposal – 26 million tonnes

    Resource recovery rates 59%

Australian Waste Stats in 2011-2012

  • Waste Generated – 62 million tonnes
  • Waste Recycled – 34 million tonnes
  • Waste to Energy Creation – 2.3 million tonnes
  • Waste Disposal – 26 million tonnes

    Resource recovery rates 58%

Australian Total Waste Stats from 2011 to 2017

Australian Total Waste Stats from 2011 to 2017

Australian Total Waste Treatment Stats from 2011 to 2017

Australian Total Waste Treatment Stats from 2011 to 2017

To conclude, the statistics derived in this blog article shows how waste generation is now gradually decreasing because of the measures that the media and schools have been taking to educate citizens about how waste disposal should be minimised to live in a healthy environment. The Australian government is also augmenting waste treatment methods to enhance the efficiency of waste management systems in Australia. 

Amongst these methods lies the need for the advent of technology. Learn how Tigernix waste management system can be value-adding for your waste management systems. 

Read the National Waste Report of 2018 (The most-up-to-date stat report of Australian disposals) by visiting this link (PDF document):